Shrub demography 1988-1993
This package includes three worksheets, namely “BD8891”, “flowers” and “hosts”. The data are repeated measures of the basal stem diameters (1988-1991), flower production (1988-1993), and host plants of marked individuals of three shrub species (Pteronia empetrifolia, P. pallens and Tripteris sinuata) under two landuse histories and three levels of current herbivory. All marked plants were in permanent (5 m x 5 m) plots in indigenous Prince Albert Succulent Karoo vegetation on Tierberg Karoo Research Centre (TKRC) and on the adjacent farms Argentina (ARG) and Tierberg (TBG). The data collection began in November 1988, 17 months after TKRC was stock-fenced to exclude sheep. Thereafter data were collected intermittently until 1993. Spanning a period of 6 years the data have potential to show the effects of sheep grazing withdrawal on plant growth and reproductive potential for farms with different grazing histories. Note: Any publications, thesis, reports etc stemming from this data must be sent to SAEON Databank for records to be kept with the data.
   
Cleared Plot Recovery
The data are projected canopy cover values (metres or percentages) and densities (counts of plants) in 2.5 m x 5 m plots before and some years after they were cleared of indigenous Prince Albert Succulent Karoo vegetation on Tierberg Karoo Research Centre (TKRC) and on the adjacent farms Argentina (ARG) and Tierberg (TBG). The research was carried out between 1989.07 and 1991.09. Data collection began in November 1989.07, 12 months after TKRC was stock-fenced to exclude sheep. Thereafter data were collected intermittently until 2005.12. Spanning a period of16 years the document vegetation recovery on small plot surrounded by natural vegetation in the presence of absence of herbivory by wildlife or sheep. This package includes three worksheets, namely “TKRC-peren” (regeneration of perennial species on TKRC), “TBG-ARG-peren” (regeneration of perennial species on TBG and ARG), and “TKRC-annuals” (being density of annual plants on cleared plots at TKRC 26 months after clearing).
   
Species Cover 1988-2006, Tierberg Karoo Research Centre
The data are projected canopy cover values (metres and percentages) and densities (counts of plants) in 5 m x 5 m plots in indigenous Prince Albert Succulent Karoo vegetation on Tierberg Karoo Research Centre (TKRC) and on the adjacent farms Argentina (ARG) and Tierberg (TBG). The data collection began in November 1988, 17 months after TKRC was stock-fenced to exclude sheep. Thereafter data were collected intermittently until June 2006. Spanning a period of18 years the data have potential to show the effects of sheep grazing withdrawal on vegetation composition for farms with different grazing histories. This package includes three worksheets, namely “Sppcov 1988-2006”, “Totcov 1988-2006” and “Density 1988-2005”. Acknowledge as follows: Data are the property of SAEON and were collected by SJ Milton, students and assistants, funded by the National Research Foundation, the Percy FitzPatrick Institute, University of Cape Town, and the Department of Science and Technology (DST) through the Biota-DST “Tierberg Reborn project”
   
Tierberg Heuweltjies
This database comprises two spreadsheets containing spatially- explicit (georeferenced) information on the use of heuweltjies (the circular patch of soil overlying buried nest mounds of the small harvester termite Microhodotermes viator) by various kinds of animals including the termites, their predator Orycteropus afer (aardvark), herbivorous rodents (Parotomys, Otomys, Hystrix), antelope (Raphicerus, Sylvicapra, Tragelaphus), and lynx (Felis caracal). It also includes some information on alien (Atriplex lindeyi) and indigenous plant species present on the heuweltjies. Analysis of the 1987-89 data shows that a wide variety of vertebrates maintain heuweltjies as disturbed, nutrient-rich sites.
   
Shrub demography 1989-1996
This package includes two worksheets “seedlings wild” and “seedlings sown”. The data in “ssedlings wild” are counts of seedlings that emerged in situ from the soil seedbank in 150 mm diameter rings pegged to the soil surface in a variety of microsites sites from 1989 to 1996. Seedling monitoring rings were placed in 55 permanent (5 m x 5 m) plots in indigenous Prince Albert Succulent Karoo vegetation on Tierberg Karoo Research Centre (TKRC) and on the adjacent farms Argentina (ARG) and Tierberg (TBG), as well microsites influenced by insects (ant mounds, termite mounds) or deposition of organic matter (litter trains). These data were originally collected to understand the influence of seed availability, weather, microsite, vegetation clearing and grazing on emergence and survival of seedlings in arid (<200ÿmm p.a.) Karoo shrubland. In undisturbed vegetation 20-800 seedlings emerged per square metre in the austral autumn when conditions were relatively cool and humid. Densities of emerging seedlings were greater in microsites influenced by grazing, insects, litter and shade than in undisturbed or exposed sites. The species composition of seedling assemblages resembled that of the surrounding vegetation. Survival of seedlings varied from 5% in 1989 and 1990 to 25% in 1991 and appeared to be limited by the quantity of rain in winter and spring. Data in “seedlings sown” are repeated counts of seedlings that emerged from sown seed of the shrubs Pteronia pallens, P. empetrifolia, Tripteris sinuata and the annual Tetragonia echinata. Seeds were sown in May 1990 and monitored until March 1992 on permanent plots in grazed and protected shrubland where neighboring plants were removed or left intact. The objective of the experiment was to understand how competition, grazing and rainfall influenced the emergence and subsequent survival of seeds of perennial and annual plants. Emergence of planted seeds was similar in all treatments, but survival of both annual and perennial species were better on cleared sites than in undisturbed vegetation. Seeds of a common annual Tetragonia echinata (Aizoaceae) maintain a seedbank but those of three perennial shrubs Pteronia empetrifolia, P. pallens and Tripteris sinuata (all Asteraceae) did not. Acknowledge as follows: Data are the property of SAEON and were collected by SJ Milton, students and assistants, funded by the National Research Foundation, the Percy FitzPatrick Institute, University of Cape Town, and the Department of Science and Technology (DST) through the Biota-DST “Tierberg Reborn project”
   
Cathedral Peak research catchments Mike`s Pass Station Fog Data
Fog data and associated climatic variables for the Mike`s Pass Automatic Weather Station at Cathedral Peak, KwaZulu-Natal. The data is at 5 minute intervals for the period 1 April 2014 to 31 March 2020.
   
Gouritz Initiative Processes East-West Mountain Corridors
Two large west-east corridors that stretch across the planning domain, linking the Swartberg and associated mountain chains in the, North. The maintenance of continuous corridors along these mountain chains provides an east-west climatic gradient, ranging from winter rainfall in the west to summer rainfall in the east.
   
District Health Barometer 2018/19
The data are a reformatted version of the 2018/19 District Health Barometer (DHB) health indicator dataset provided by the HST. The intention of this publication was to provide an overview of the delivery of selected healthcare services in the public health sector across the provinces, districts and local municipalities/sub-districts of South Africa. The DHB has been an annual publication since 2005. The main focus of the 2018/19 publication is the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)a and the Universal Health Coverage (UHC)b index. Data are drawn from the electronic District Health Information Software (WebDHIS), the Ideal Clinic Realisation and Maintenance system, Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) surveys, the National Treasury Basic Accounting System (BAS), the Personnel Administration (PERSAL) system, the TIER.Net for Tuberculosis (TB) and antiretroviral (ART) data, the Electronic Drug-resistant Tuberculosis Register (EDRWeb), the National Income Dynamics Study (NiDS), and other National Department of Health (NDoH) information systems. The publication seeks to highlight inequities in health outcomes, health-resource allocation and health delivery, and to track the efficiency of health processes, across all provinces and districts. Modifications were made to the data table provided in line with Hadley Wickem`s `tidy data` standards for statistical research (10.18637/jss.v059.i10). The dates of the indices were also standardised to represent a single year in the YYYY format and a column of municipal codes was allocated to each row in line with the coding from the South African Municipal Demarcation Board. Lastly, centroids of the political areas described (national, provincial, district municipal, and local municipal areas) were added as applied in a final column.
   
Population estimation of a cryptic moss frog using acoustic spatially explicit capture recapture
Cryptic amphibians pose a problem for conservation managers as they are difficult to find to assess initial populations, and monitor changes during potentially threatening processes. The rough moss frog, Arthroleptella rugosa, is small and occurs in seepages on a single unprotected mountain in South Africa's fire prone, biodiverse fynbos biome. The area is heavily impacted by invasive plants, which dry seepages and increase the frequency and intensity of fires, leading to the assessment of this species as Critically Endangered. We aimed to test the efficacy of acoustic spatially explicit capture recapture (aSCR) to estimate the entire population of calling adult A. rugosa, and assess the impacts by invasive plants. Using aSCR, our estimates suggest that the population of A. rugosa is more than five times that previously estimated using manual calling surveys on the mountain. This despite an intense fire over the entire area three years earlier that reduced the calling population to a few tens of individuals. Our vegetation surveys suggest that the ongoing removal of invasive species from the mountain is successful in areas occupied by A. rugosa, but that adjacent areas invaded by pines and hakea have a negative impact on calling density. The private public conservancy partnership on Klein Swartberg Mountain, is conserving this frog but will require ongoing management and monitoring to ensure conservation in the future
   
Total Biomass Organic Carbon of Natural and Transformed areas (gC/sq.m)
The Total Biomass Organic Carbon of Natural and Transformed areas could simply be added together as they have each been corrected for fractional land cover. It therefore represents all the biomass organic carbon of natural vegetation, crops, urban areas and forestry plantations. For details see Total Biomass Organic Carbon of Transformed Areas and Total Biomass Organic Carbon of Natural Areas
   
Total Biomass Organic Carbon of Natural areas (gC/sq.m)
Total Biomass Organic Carbon (TBOC) of natural land cover is the total sum of Above Ground Woody Biomass (AGBwoody), Below Ground Woody Biomass (BGBwoody), Above Ground Herbaceous Biomass (AGBherb), Below Ground Herbaceous Biomass (BGBherb), and Aboveground litter (AGL). In other words it is TEOC minus Soil Organic Carbon (SOC). Units: average gC/m2within 1km x 1km pixel
   
Total Biomass Organic Carbon of Transformed areas (gC/sq.m)
In areas which have been transformed to cultivation or forestry plantations municipal level agricultural senses data were used to assign the biomass values to areas covered by the specific fractional land cover or crop type.
   
Education District Boundaries
Layer describing the new education district boundaries implemented 1 January 2016. Changes are primarily in the Metro area.
   
Cold Spells
In South Africa cold spells are defined as 3 or more consecutive days with minimum temperatures below 2.5 degree Celsius, severe cold spells are 3 or more consecutive days with minima below freezing point, i.e. 0 degree Celsius, while extreme cold spells are defined as 3 or more consecutive days with temperatures below -2.5 degree Celsius. In South Africa the main causes of cold spells are outbreaks of Antarctic air which follow cold fronts, and in the southern hemisphere with its vast tracts of oceans, these cold fronts are frequently well developed. Cold spells affect many sectors, including health, especially exposure to low temperatures, energy, with marked increases in electricity consumption for heating purposes. In agriculture some consequences of cold spells include frost and freeze impacts, especially if the cold spells occur early or livestock losses, where the livestock has not been protected from the cold. The temperature database created for South Africa by Schulze and Maharaj (2004) was used to compute frequencies of cold spells. In this temperature database daily maximum and minimum temperatures were generated for the 50 year period 1950 - 1999 at 429 - 700 one arc minute grid points covering the area, by using observed daily temperatures of varying durations from 973 temperature stations with quality controlled data which were infilled and extended to the common 50 year period by techniques outlined in Schulze and Maharaj (2004) and interpolated/extrapolated using regional and monthly temperature lapse rates. What was not accounted for in mapping cold spell occurrences at each of the grid points was whether a point was located in a valley, and therefore subject to cross-sectional nocturnal cold air drainage from crest to valley bottom in the winter months, or on a crest. Schulze and Maharaj (2004) found some differences between minimum temperatures from stations located in valleys vs those on crests, but were not able to map such temperature differences because of the complex dynamics of determining longitudinal cold air drainage within a valley, i.e. from higher altitudes of the upper valley to the lower altitudes of the lower valley.
   
Bosboukloof rain gauge 11B (400m), event rainfall, 06/2011 - 09/2019
Event rainfall data collected by Davis Instruments (2011-2017) and Texas Electronics (2017- current) tipping bucket gauge installed at 1.2m above ground at 400 masl in the Bosboukloof catchment of the Jonkershoek valley in the Western Cape of South Africa. Data recorded by a Pendant Event logger (UA-003-64, Onset, Massachusetts, U.S.A). Tipping bucket calibrated to a 0.2 mm (Davis) or 0.254 mm (Texas) per tip event. (Collection continuing, contact SAEON for updated datasets)
   
IBA Shapefile September 2015.shp
The Important Bird and Biodiveristy Areas (IBA) Programme is a BirdLife International Programme to conserve habitats that are important for birds. These areas are defined according to a strict set of guidelines and criteria based on the species that occur in the area. The Important Bird Areas ofSouthern Africa directory was first published 1998 and identified withinSouth Africa 122 IBAs. In September 2015 a revised IBA Directory waspublished by BirdLife South Africa. All these IBAs were objectivelydetermined using established and globally accepted criteria. An IBA isselected on the presence of the following bird species in a geographic area: Bird species of global or regional conservation concern; Assemblages of restricted-range bird species; Assemblages of biome-restricted bird species; and Concentrations of numbers of congregatory bird species. For more information see: http://www.birdlife.org.za/conservation/importantbird-areas/documents-and-downloads
   
Namakwa District critical biodiversity assessment aquatic (NDM_CBAs_AQUATIC_region.shp)
Namakwa District critical biodiversity assessment aquatic
   
Gouritz Ecological Processes - Koppies 2004 (gi_koppies.shp)
Gouritz Initiative - Processes Koppies. Sensitive koppies in the Gouritz Initiative, which support highly localized geophytes and small succulent plants, which are often threatened.
   
Namakwa District critical biodiversity assessment terrestrial NDM_CBAs_TERRESTRIAL_region.shp
Namakwa District critical biodiversity assessment terrestrial
   
KZNSCP: Vegetation Types (kznveg05v2_1_11)
This coverage represents an update of the vegetation map[kznveg05v210_wll] whose updates were completed on 4 September 2009.Several additions have been made which is represented in the Appendix 1of the the KwaZulu Natal Vegetation Type Description Document forVegetation Map 2011. These additions were made based on data that wasreceived in an effort to make the map more current and representative ofKZNs vegetation.
   
Cold Spells
In South Africa cold spells are defined as 3 or more consecutive days with minimum temperatures below 2.5 degree Celsius, severe cold spells are 3 or more consecutive days with minima below freezing point, i.e. 0 degree Celsius, while extreme cold spells are defined as 3 or more consecutive days with temperatures below -2.5 degree Celsius. In South Africa the main causes of cold spells are outbreaks of Antarctic air which follow cold fronts, and in the southern hemisphere with its vast tracts of oceans, these cold fronts are frequently well developed. Cold spells affect many sectors, including health, especially exposure to low temperatures, energy, with marked increases in electricity consumption for heating purposes. In agriculture some consequences of cold spells include frost and freeze impacts, especially if the cold spells occur early or livestock losses, where the livestock has not been protected from the cold. The temperature database created for South Africa by Schulze and Maharaj (2004) was used to compute frequencies of cold spells. In this temperature database daily maximum and minimum temperatures were generated for the 50 year period 1950 - 1999 at 429 - 700 one arc minute grid points covering the area, by using observed daily temperatures of varying durations from 973 temperature stations with quality controlled data which were infilled and extended to the common 50 year period by techniques outlined in Schulze and Maharaj (2004) and interpolated/extrapolated using regional and monthly temperature lapse rates. What was not accounted for in mapping cold spell occurrences at each of the grid points was whether a point was located in a valley, and therefore subject to cross-sectional nocturnal cold air drainage from crest to valley bottom in the winter months, or on a crest. Schulze and Maharaj (2004) found some differences between minimum temperatures from stations located in valleys vs those on crests, but were not able to map such temperature differences because of the complex dynamics of determining longitudinal cold air drainage within a valley, i.e. from higher altitudes of the upper valley to the lower altitudes of the lower valley.
   
Cold Spells
In South Africa cold spells are defined as 3 or more consecutive days with minimum temperatures below 2.5 degree Celsius, severe cold spells are 3 or more consecutive days with minima below freezing point, i.e. 0 degree Celsius, while extreme cold spells are defined as 3 or more consecutive days with temperatures below -2.5 degree Celsius. In South Africa the main causes of cold spells are outbreaks of Antarctic air which follow cold fronts, and in the southern hemisphere with its vast tracts of oceans, these cold fronts are frequently well developed. Cold spells affect many sectors, including health, especially exposure to low temperatures, energy, with marked increases in electricity consumption for heating purposes. In agriculture some consequences of cold spells include frost and freeze impacts, especially if the cold spells occur early or livestock losses, where the livestock has not been protected from the cold. The temperature database created for South Africa by Schulze and Maharaj (2004) was used to compute frequencies of cold spells. In this temperature database daily maximum and minimum temperatures were generated for the 50 year period 1950 - 1999 at 429 - 700 one arc minute grid points covering the area, by using observed daily temperatures of varying durations from 973 temperature stations with quality controlled data which were infilled and extended to the common 50 year period by techniques outlined in Schulze and Maharaj (2004) and interpolated/extrapolated using regional and monthly temperature lapse rates. What was not accounted for in mapping cold spell occurrences at each of the grid points was whether a point was located in a valley, and therefore subject to cross-sectional nocturnal cold air drainage from crest to valley bottom in the winter months, or on a crest. Schulze and Maharaj (2004) found some differences between minimum temperatures from stations located in valleys vs those on crests, but were not able to map such temperature differences because of the complex dynamics of determining longitudinal cold air drainage within a valley, i.e. from higher altitudes of the upper valley to the lower altitudes of the lower valley.